Pigskinkids's Blog


What is the optimum age to begin playing tackle football?

This question differs for each child. Not every child is physically and emotionally developed for a contact sport of the same predetermined age. It is important not to push the child, but observe his physical abilities and his desire to play the game. It is important the child truly wants to play football. If the child is not physically ready you can always start with flag football.

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My child is not getting the required playing time. What should I do?

Playing time is often an issue with teams.  As noted in question 4 above, it is good to understand the rules concerning playing time before making the initial decision for your child to play in a league.  If you feel that the coach is not adhering to the league rules concerning playing time, make sure you are observing exactly what is happening in games.  Sometimes we may “think” our child isn’t getting enough playing time when, in fact, they are.  If you feel there is a problem, I would suggest you first talk with your child and ask him what he thinks and what the coach has said to him. This may give you some insight into what is happening on the bench or in the locker room.  If you continue to believe this is an issue which needs to be addressed with the coach, encourage your child to talk to the coach himself. Help your child learn how to approach the coach and ask for what he wants. This is a great opportunity for a child to gain self-confidence and develop communication skills he will need in the future.  If your child is unwilling or incapable of discussing the issue with the coach himself, the next course of action would be for you to talk with the coach.  Ask questions and listen to what the coach has to say.  A confrontational manner will make it more difficult to resolve the issue quickly, so remain positive in your approach and communication.  Above all, use this opportunity to help your child learn a life lesson that life is not always fair but he must keep working to improve and remain a team player in spite of the situation.



Should I be concerned if my coach is swearing, yelling at the kids when they make a mistake and is (in my opinion) too aggressive? If so, how should I handle it so that my player won’t be penalized?

Swearing at children is not good coaching.  Whether a coach is considered to be too aggressive will vary from one parent’s perspective to another’s. You might consider the 24-hour rule—don’t talk to the coach right after the game, instead wait for at least 24 hours. After 24 hours both you and the coach will have had time to calm down and  consider your perspective. You may not agree with all the decisions but it is essential as a team to support the coach. It serves no purpose and sets a bad example for a parent to bad-mouth the coach. Encourage your child to work through the circumstances and strive to perform as his highest level.



How can I help motivate my child?

Talk to your child about practice on a daily basis. Ask him what he thinks was best about practice, what was the most exciting part, what was the best thing that he did? Not every practice will be positive, but the important part is how your child feels about himself and his experience.



What is the most important thing parents should know about youth football?
September 2, 2010, 10:48 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

As with all sports, learn the philosophy of the organization/league in which child will be participating.  It’s important that you feel comfortable with the coach and his knowledge of the game. The coach should have a firm understanding of the hitting aspects of the game. When you decide to allow your child to participate, understand that the coach calls the shots and you are a positive spectator.



My child is not getting the required playing time. What should I do?

Playing time is often an issue with teams.  As noted in question 4 above, it is good to understand the rules concerning playing time before making the initial decision for your child to play in a league.  If you feel that the coach is not adhering to the league rules concerning playing time, make sure you are observing exactly what is happening in games.  Sometimes we may “think” our child isn’t getting enough playing time when, in fact, they are.  If you feel there is a problem, I would suggest you first talk with your child and ask him what he thinks and what the coach has said to him. This may give you some insight into what is happening on the bench or in the locker room.  If you continue to believe this is an issue which needs to be addressed with the coach, encourage your child to talk to the coach himself. Help your child learn how to approach the coach and ask for what he wants. This is a great opportunity for a child to gain self-confidence and develop communication skills he will need in the future.  If your child is unwilling or incapable of discussing the issue with the coach himself, the next course of action would be for you to talk with the coach.  Ask questions and listen to what the coach has to say.  A confrontational manner will make it more difficult to resolve the issue quickly, so remain positive in your approach and communication.  Above all, use this opportunity to help your child learn a life lesson that life is not always fair but he must keep working to improve and remain a team player in spite of the situation.



What can I do if I feel the coach made a bad decision regarding my player?

Depending on the situation, start off by talking to the coach one-on-one; and if that doesn’t work,  go to someone within the organization.